How to beat the heat

Tips for preparing for – and staying safe during – a heat wave

summer-heat

Beaches will no doubt be busy places this weekend, as temperatures in Northeast Ohio are expected to soar into the 90s (don’t forget the sunscreen!)

Here are some tips for preparing for extended periods of excessive heat:

  • Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
  • Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
  • Discuss heat safety precautions with members of your household. Have a plan for wherever you spend time— home, work and school—and prepare for power outages.
  • Know those in your neighborhood who are elderly, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help.
  • If you do not have air conditioning, choose places you could go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls).
  • Be aware that people living in urban areas may be at greater risk from the effects of a prolonged heat wave than are people living in rural areas.
  • Get trained in First Aid to learn how to treat heat-related emergencies.
  • Ensure that your animals’ needs for water and shade are met.

Icon Disaster

During a heat wave, we encourage you and your family to:

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
  • Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

More helpful information, including how to treat heat-related illnesses and preparing for power outages can be found here.

And if you find relief from the heat at a beach, whether it be at Atwood Lake, Pymatuning State Park, or along the shores of Lake Erie, be sure to observe the rules of water safety.

And have fun!

 

Fourth of July Safety Tips

Happy Independence Day!Founders
Northeast Ohioans can expect a gorgeous Holiday weekend and many are expected to celebrate at a backyard party or poolside.

Whatever way you chose to enjoy yourself during the party weekend of the summer, be sure to keep these simple, safety tips in mind.

Soak Up the Sun, Safely:

Keep your skin safe by wearing sunscreen outdoors, even if it is partly sunny. But how exactly does sunscreen work? According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. All products do not have the same ingredients so if you have a bad skin reaction to one brand, try another.

Know your sunscreen’s rating. All sunscreens have a sun protection factor (SPF) number clearly stated on their label. The SPF number illustrates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. Look for sunscreen with at least a rating of SPF 15. This number applies to cosmetics that contain sunscreen as well. And be sure to check out your label’s directions regarding reapplication. Most brands recommend reapplying after two hours or after swimming, sweating or toweling off.

Sunscreen does have a shelf life! Check your sunscreen’s expiration date. If it is expired, or you’ve had it for three years, throw it out and purchase new.

Take Water Seriously:

Stay hydrated! Drink plenty of water, even if you are not “thirsty”. Avoid drinking alcohol or caffeinated beverages in excess.

Use the buddy system when swimming. No one should swim alone. Adults should pay close and constant attention to children and inexperienced swimmers. Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.

Download the free Red Cross Swim and First Aid Apps. Swim App users can learn water safety and drowning prevention information for a variety of aquatic environments. Children can have fun learning water safety tips with the child-friendly videos and quizzes in the app. The First Aid App puts expert advice for everyday emergencies at someone’s fingertips. The apps are available for smart phones and tablets and can be downloaded from the Apple or Google Play for Android app stores. The Swim App is also available in the Amazon Kindle Store.

Backyard Pool Owners can take the Home Pool Essentials online course. The Red Cross and National Swimming Pool Foundation have developed an online safety course for pool and hot tub owners. Home Pool Essentials (HomePoolEssentials.org) helps people understand the risks of pool ownership, how to maintain a safer and cleaner pool, what safety equipment is appropriate, how to prevent pool and hot tub entrapment hazards and how to respond to an emergency.

For more water safety information check out redcross.org.

Fireworks and Flag