Give blood: Help patients in need this summer

July 12, 2019- With the weather in Northeast Ohio heating up and families away enjoying vacations,  there are fewer blood drives being held. This creates a difficult situation for the blood supply, and the American Red Cross is facing an emergency need for blood and platelet donors after a significant shortfall in blood donations during the Independence Day holiday week and ongoing challenges finding new blood donors.

Following the Fourth of July week, about 450 fewer blood drives were organized by businesses and other community groups than during a typical week as people across the country celebrated the holiday with activities and travel. This led to about 17,000 fewer blood donations than needed for patients in a single week, causing the Red Cross to now have less than a three-day supply of most blood types available – and less than a two-day supply of type O blood – for patients. At least a five-day supply is desired.

give now

Eligible individuals are urged to give now to help avoid delays in lifesaving medical care for patients this summer.

Don’t wait – help now:

  1. Make an appointment to give blood or platelets by downloading the free Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).
  2. Let your friends and family know there is a #BloodEmergency and ask them to give now.
  3. Bring someone to donate with you.

Blood transfusion is the fourth most common inpatient hospital procedure in the U.S., and these blood products can only come from volunteer donors. Yet, only 3 out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood. It’s crucial that the Red Cross has a sufficient blood supply on hand to meet the needs of patients every day and to be prepared for emergencies that require significant volumes of donated blood products

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Upcoming Northeast Ohio blood donation opportunities:

To help with the blood supply crisis, all across the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio region, there are blood donation opportunities, ensuring there is a blood drive near you:

Ashtabula County:

Andover

7/16/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Andover Christian Church, 200 Stillman Ave

7/20/2019: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Andover United Methodist Church, 181 South Main Street

Ashtabula

7/17/2019: 2 p.m. – 8 p.m., Community Counseling Center, 2801 C Court

7/23/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Kent State University, 3300 Lake Rd. West

7/25/2019: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Ashtabula County Medical Center, 2420 Lake Ave.

7/31/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., YMCA, 263 W. Prospect

Conneaut

7/24/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 876 Grove St.

Geneva

7/21/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Peoples Church, 300 South Ridge East

7/22/2019: 1:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Assumption Church, 594 West Main Street

Jefferson

7/18/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Ashtabula Cnty Commissioners, 25 West Jefferson Street

7/19/2019: 1:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Jefferson Church of the Nazarene, 55 E. Satin Street

Cuyahoga County:

Beachwood

7/19/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Beachwood Community Center, 25451 Fairmount Blvd

7/20/2019: 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Beachwood Public Library, 25501 Shaker Blvd.

7/23/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Administrative Campus, 25875 Science Park Drive, Building 1

7/23/2019: 12 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Cleveland Clinic, 26900 Cedar Road

Berea

7/27/2019: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Berea Recreation Center, 451 Front St

Brecksville

7/18/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Brecksville Community Center, One Community Drive

Chagrin Falls

7/16/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., United Methodist Church, 20 South Franklin Street

Cleveland

7/13/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/14/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/14/2019: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m., St Leo The Great Church, 4940 Broadview Road

7/15/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/16/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Lutheran Hospital, 1730 West 25th Street

7/16/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/17/2019: 6 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Dave McCall Union Hall, 3421 Independence Road

7/17/2019: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Dave’s Market MidTown, 1929 East 61st street

7/17/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Dave McCall Union Hall, 3421 Independence Road

7/17/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/18/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/19/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/19/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Fairview Hospital, 18101 Lorain Ave.

7/20/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/21/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/21/2019: 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Our Lady of Angels Church, 3644 Rocky River Drive

7/21/2019: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., University Circle United Methodist Church, University Circle United Methodist Church, 1919 East 107th

7/22/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/23/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, 9500 Euclid Ave.

7/23/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/24/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, 3900 Wildlife Way

7/24/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/25/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/26/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/26/2019: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Cuyahoga County Administration Building, 2079 E. 9th Street, 4th Floor

7/27/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/27/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Omega Psi Phi, 15435 St. Clair

7/28/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/29/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/29/2019: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Cuyahoga Community College Metro Campus, 2900 Community College Ave.

7/30/2019: 12:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., LifeBanc, 4775 Richmond Road

7/30/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

7/31/2019: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., One Cleveland Center, 1375 E.9th St., Building Management

7/31/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Carl B Stokes Court House, 801 West Superior Ave

7/31/2019: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Galleria Erieview Plaza, 1301 East 9th Street

7/31/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Frank J Lausche State Office Building, 615 Superior Avenue N.W.

7/31/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Warzel Blood Donation Center, 3747 Euclid Avenue

Cleveland Heights

7/15/2019: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Cleveland Hts Library, 2345 Lee Road

7/31/2019: 8 a.m. – 3 p.m., Cleveland Heights Community Center, 1 Monticello Blvd.

Fairview Park

7/24/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Fairview Recreation Center, 21225 Lorain Road

Garfield Heights

7/22/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Garfield Hts Civic Center, 5407 Turney Road

Highland Hills

7/25/2019: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Metropolitan Plaza, 22901 Millcreek Boulevard

Independence

7/23/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Park Center Building I, 6100 Oak Tree Blvd

7/29/2019: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Independence Community Center, 6363 Selig Drive

Lakewood

7/19/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., O’Neill Healthcare- Lakewood, 1381 Bunts Rd.

7/22/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Lakewood Womens Club Pavilion, 14532 Lake Ave.

7/29/2019: 3 p.m. – 8 p.m., Lakewood YMCA, 16915 Detroit Rd.

Mayfield Heights

7/16/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Hillcrest Hospital, 6780 Mayfield Road

Mayfield Village

7/17/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Mayfield Village Civic Center, 6622 Wilson Mills Rd.

7/25/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 700 Beta Drive

North Olmsted

7/19/2019: 10:45 a.m. – 3:45 p.m., North Olmsted Community Cabin, 28114 Lorain Rd.

North Royalton

7/30/2019: 1:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Cuyahoga County Library North Royalton Branch, 5071 Wallings Rd

Olmsted Falls

7/25/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Cuyahoga County Library Olmsted Falls Branch, 8100 Mapleway Dr

Parma

7/13/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/14/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/15/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/16/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/17/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/17/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cuyahoga County Library Parma-Snow, 2121 Snow Road

7/18/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/19/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/20/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/21/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/22/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/23/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/24/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/25/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/26/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/27/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/28/2019: 7:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/29/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/30/2019: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Cuyahoga Community College West Campus, 11000 Pleasant Valley Rd

7/30/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

7/31/2019: 12:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m., Parma Blood Donation Center, 5585 Pearl Road

Rocky River

7/21/2019: 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., St Christopher Catholic Church, 20141 Detroit Rd

Seven Hills

7/26/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Seven Hills Cmnty Rec Center, 7777 Summitview Drive

Solon

7/16/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Signature of Solon, 39000 Signature Drive

7/30/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Solon, 29800 Bainbridge Road

7/30/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Church of the Resurrection, 32001 Cannon Road

Strongsville

7/16/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Strongsville, 16761 Southpark Center

7/26/2019: 10:15 a.m. – 3:15 p.m., Cuyahoga County Library Strongsville Branch, 18700 Westwood Dr

7/27/2019: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Ehrnfelt Recreation Center, 18100 Royalton Rd

Valley View

7/16/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Valley View Community Center, 6828 Hathaway Road

Westlake

7/21/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 28455 Center Ridge Road

7/22/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Westlake Porter Public Library, 27333 Center Ridge Rd.

Erie County:

Huron

7/17/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., St Peter Catholic Church, 430 Main St.

7/25/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Huron Public Library, 333 Williams St.

Sandusky

7/17/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Kroger Marketplace, 226 E Perkins Ave

7/25/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Holy Angels Catholic Church, 428 Tiffin Ave

7/26/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Firelands Regional Medical Center, 1912 Hayes Ave Sandusky

7/27/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sandusky Mall, Rt. 250 Milan Rd.

7/30/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., American Legion, 3615 Hayes Ave

Vermilion

7/22/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Ritter Public Library, 5680 Liberty Ave.

7/23/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Vermilion High School, 1250 Sanford Street

Geauga County:

Burton

7/13/2019: 2 p.m. – 8 p.m., Joes Vinyl Window Shop, 15020 Shedd Road

Chagrin Falls

7/20/2019: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., RiPT Fitness, 8464 E. Washington St.

Chardon

7/14/2019: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Church of Saint Mary, 401 North St.

7/18/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Munson Town Hall, 12210  Auburn Rd.

Chesterland

7/16/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Geauga West Library, 13455 Chillicothe Rd.

Huron County:

Greenwich

7/30/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., The Ripley Church, 4130 Edwards Road

Norwalk

7/15/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 60 West Main St.

7/26/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Fisher-Titus Medical Center, 272 Benedict Ave.

Plymouth

7/18/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Plymouth Village Community Building, 48 West Broadway

Willard

7/24/2019: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., St Francis Xavier School, 25 West Perry St.

Lake County:

Eastlake

7/24/2019: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Lake County Captains, 35300 Vine Street

7/26/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Four Points by Sheraton, 35000 Curtis Blvd

Kirtland

7/29/2019: 12 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Kirtland Public Library, 9267 Chillicothe Rd.

Madison

7/15/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cornerstone Friends Church, 2300 Hubbard Rd.

Mentor

7/14/2019: 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., St Gabriel Church, 9925 Johnnycake Ridge Rd.

7/15/2019: 12 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Mentor Civic Arena, 8600 Munson Rd.

7/26/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Lowes of Mentor, 9600 Mentor Ave.

7/26/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Hope Ridge United Methodist Church, 9870 Johnnycake Ridge Rd.

7/29/2019: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m., Pinegate Community Clubhouse, 6301 Gatewood Dr.

Painesville

7/15/2019: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., First Church Congregational, 22 Liberty St.

7/31/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., 1922 Coffee & Brew, 1505 Madison Ave

Perry

7/16/2019: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Perry United Methodist Church, 3875 Main St.

Willoughby

7/25/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Willoughby Library, 30 Public Square

Willoughby Hills

7/18/2019: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Willoughby Hills Community Center, 35400 Chardon Rd.

Willowick

7/19/2019: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Willowick Community Center, 321 East 314th Street

Lorain County:

Avon

7/15/2019: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., French Creek Family YMCA, 2010 Recreation Lane

7/24/2019: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., VFW hall, 36950 Mills Rd

7/29/2019: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Costco Avon, 35804 Detroit Road

Columbia Station

7/14/2019: 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m., Christ Church, 23080 Royalton Rd.

Elyria

7/31/2019: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Am Red Cross Lorain County, 2929 West River Road North

Wellington

7/24/2019: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Penfield Township Community Center, 41012 State Route 18

Please make an appointment to give now.

Northeast Ohio Region weekend disaster response report: July 4-7, 2019

By Eric Alves, Regional Communications Specialist, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio

July 8, 2019- As residents across Northeast Ohio were enjoying barbecues, fireworks, nice weather and the start of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game festivities, the American Red Cross was actively assisting individuals who were experiencing their most difficult moments.

During Independence Day weekend, July 4-7, the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio responded to 13 incidents, including a structural collapse in Lorain. The disaster team assisted 34 adults, 24 children and provided more than $13,000 in immediate financial assistance to help these individuals get back on their feet following the local disaster.

Another weekend incident the disaster team responded to over the holiday weekend, was a home fire resulting from arson on Dudley Avenue in Cleveland.

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Dudley Avenue home fire

“It has been a busy time with home fires recently in Northeast Ohio. We have responded to multiple fires in the last few weeks under suspicion of arson. This is one of the wonderful attributes of this organization. We are so inclusive that we provide assistance to anyone who is in need, despite how the disaster began,” said Ben Bellucci, the disaster program manager for the Greater Cleveland Chapter.

“This past weekend, the volunteers were beyond amazing,” Ben added. “With the average temperatures in the 90s and high humidity, the disaster action team was up at all hours providing light in many individuals’ darkest hours. We can’t do it without our volunteers, and the generosity of our community, who all make it possible.”

Just as disasters do not discriminate in terms of whose lives they destroy; the Red Cross does not discriminate in terms of whose lives we help rebuild. The Red Cross does not turn away people who need assistance after a disaster. We are committed to helping everyone in need.

As the largest humanitarian organization in the world, the Red Cross has the ability to use your donation to reach more people in need, more quickly. Your donation to the Red Cross helps provide food, shelter, relief supplies, emotional support, recovery planning and other assistance during disasters.

To help the Red Cross provide hope and comfort to individuals in Northeast Ohio experiencing their darkest hours, please visit our Crowdrise page to provide a financial donation. Any amount donated truly helps with their recovery.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Stay safe this Fourth of July with these safety tips

By Samantha Pudelski, American Red Cross volunteer

July 3, 2019- With Fourth of July celebrations almost under way, the Northeast Ohio Region of the American Red Cross has some fireworks safety tips to make sure everyone stays safe this holiday.

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“Fourth of July is a great holiday for families to enjoy the summer weather but we want everyone to stay safe, especially when it comes to fireworks,” said Tim O’Toole, regional disaster officer for the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio. “These safety tips will ensure that everyone can have an enjoyable and safe Independence Day, including pets.”

Attend a Public Fireworks Show

The safest way to enjoy fireworks this Fourth of July is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. Make sure to stay at least 500 feet away from the show and leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks.

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If you or someone you know is setting off fireworks at home, follow these safety steps:

  • Never give fireworks to small children.
  • Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials, and make sure to light them a safe distance away.
  • Always follow the instructions on the packaging.
  • Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
  • Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
  • Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight “a dud.”
  • Always have an adult supervise any fireworks activities, even sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees — hot enough to melt some metals.
  • After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding it to prevent a trash fire.

Many communities in Northeast Ohio are hosting fireworks shows throughout the Fourth of July weekend. Click here for a full listing of shows in the area.

Pet Safety

Hurricane Florence 2018

July 5th is the busiest day at local animal shelters due to animals being scared by fireworks and running away. Here are some tips to keep your furry friends safe this Independence Day:

  • Keep your pets inside on the lowest level of your home.
  • Turn on a television or radio to help cover some the loud noises that may be outside.
  • Before fireworks and other festivities begin, get your pet to be active, such as going on a long hike. A pet that is mentally and physically exhausted is less likely to react to fireworks and other loud noises.
  • Provide your pet a distraction, such as a delicious treat or toys, to keep them occupied.
  • Comfort them. Sitting close to your pet, petting them gently and offering quiet words of reassurance during scary events like fireworks can help to center them and might even reduce their fearfulness.
  • Make sure your pet has access to a favorite and comforting area, such as a bedroom.
  • Try an anxiety vest. Much like swaddling helps to calm infants, a snug garment that puts gentle pressure on your pet’s torso can reduce fireworks anxiety. Get your furry  friend used to wearing a pressure wrap before fireworks so that by the time the event arrives, they will be comfortable with the garment.
  • Just in case your pet does escape, make sure your pet’s identification is up to date and that you have a current photo ready.

Fireworks aren’t the only things that pose a home fire risk – this video can help you avoid home fires due to cooking accidents:

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Play Ball! Chapter volunteers treated to night at the ballpark

By Jim McIntyre, Regional Communications & Marketing Manager, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio

June 28, 2019- Ballgame!

Volunteers of the Greater Cleveland Chapter brought home a winner on Saturday, June 22, 2019, gathering at Classic Park in Eastlake to watch the Lake County Captains play the West Michigan Whitecaps. It was Heroes Appreciation Night at the ballpark, and some American Red Cross hero volunteers took advantage of the offer to go to the game free of charge to recognize their vital contributions to the Red Cross mission.

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Fans of the Lake County Captains, a Class A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, weren’t disappointed. The Captains beat West Michigan 5-2.

“We can’t think of a better place to honor our heroes, our Red Cross volunteers, than at a Lake County Captains game,” said Mike Parks, Regional CEO of the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio.  He then led the crowd as they sang “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” during the 7th inning stretch.

Before the game, Mike threw out one of the ceremonial first pitches. Afterward, he claimed the Burning River jersey he was awarded for submitting the highest bid. It was autographed by Captain’s pitcher Thomas Ponticelli, who led  the Captains with a combined no-hitter the night before.

Volunteers received vouchers for free parking and a meal, so they didn’t have to spend a dime to have good time at the ballpark. It was a great evening of summertime baseball and a fun way to reward the dedicated volunteers who pitch in to help the Red Cross serve up  relief on a daily basis for community members in need.

See more photos in our Flickr album here.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

 

Golfers and local community score at annual Red Cross Cup

By Eric Alves, Regional Communications Specialist, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio

June 26, 2019-On June 24, the American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio spent a day on the links as they hosted the annual Red Cross Cup at Canterbury Golf Club for a day of friendship, food and golf. Individual and team golfers who placed that day weren’t the only winners. Proceeds from the event will benefit local families affected by disasters.

The event began with the annual meeting of the Greater Cleveland Chapter board of directors, with breakfast provided by members of the Tiffany Circle. The breakfast was held in honor of the late Frann Zverina, a longtime Red Cross supporter.

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Following the meeting, the fun and excitement was ready to get underway.

Before the golfers began play, Jensen Lewis, former Cleveland Indians pitcher and current co-host of the Indians Live broadcast on Fox Sports Ohio, spoke and answered questions regarding the current state of the 2019 team.

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Perhaps through the power of late golf legends Arnold Palmer, Walter Hagen, Ben Hogan and Bobby Jones, the rain held off and the golfers were able to enjoy playing 18 holes on a nationally recognized top 100 golf course in the United States. Participants also had an opportunity to win the use of a new vehicle as part of the hole-in-one contest sponsored by Deacon’s Chrysler Dodge Jeep RAM.

After the score cards were reviewed and scores tallied, golfers were recognized in two categories, scramble and competitive:

Scramble

1st Place: Paul McCrory, Casey Ball, Joe Laehu and Troy Martzall – 64

2nd Place: Michael Burgess, Changing Rhodes, Michael Simpson and Traci Veach – 64

3rd Place: Mike Conley, Austin Cook, Ron Warzel and Chris Schons – 65

Competitive

1st Place: Ben Janozzo – 73

2nd Place: Matt Zajac – 76

3rd Place: Chuck Jones – 77

Following the day on the greens and the award ceremony, golfers enjoyed food, drinks and firsthand analysis from Cleveland sports greats Hanford Dixon and Kevin Mack of the Cleveland Browns,  Jim Chones and Campy Russell of Cleveland Cavaliers and Jonathan Wells of The Ohio State Buckeyes. The question-and-answer segment was emceed by Bruce Drennan of Fox Sports Ohio.

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Thanks to our generous sponsors, including presenting sponsor Home Savings Bank, for ensuring the 2019 Red Cross Cup was a great success and enjoyed by all. Proceeds from the event will assist families who experience disasters like home fires, and who need shelter, food, relief supplies, emotional support and a way forward after experiencing their darkest hours.

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Click here to visit our photo album on Flickr to see photos from the 2019 Red Cross Cup.

We look forward to seeing everyone on the golf course in 2020!

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer.

Acts of Courage & Spirit Awards: Honoring individuals for heroism

By Mark Sitch, American Red Cross volunteer

June 21, 2019- The annual Acts of Courage & the Spirit of the Red Cross awards was held at the Metroplex in Liberty, Ohio on Thursday, June 13th. It is regarded as the greatest evening of celebrated acts of courage, compassion, character & humility in which the Red Cross Lake to River Chapter proudly honors its deserving recipients each year.

Following a guest reception and social period, Debbi Grinstein, Lake to River board chair, welcomed all to an evening of regional recognition. Opening remarks followed the presentation of colors by Troop 40 of Girard and the chapter’s Disaster Action Teams (DAT) that took part in the hero’s processional. The program master of ceremonies was Greg Greenwood, representing the Greenwood Foundation and a Red Cross Hope Partner.

After a delicious dinner buffet was enjoyed by nearly 300 in attendance, the focal point of this night was now center stage. The spirit of giving and courage was squarely in the spotlight with patriotism for our country, community and individuals exemplifying acts of selflessness. Ten individuals for their heroic efforts and a respected business that captured the spirit of proactive giving were honored. Recipients were:

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Nathen White – (Mahoning County) The Mill Creek Metro Park police officer didn’t plan on saving the life of Malayla Jackson. However, recognizing her allergic reaction, struggling to breathe and time restraints, he hurried her to the hospital in his squad car for the help needed for her survival. “She felt like she was dying”, time was critical and officer White’s quick actions saved her life.

Candice Desanzo – (East Palestine) didn’t know Ruth Kennedy; that is until their paths crossed in an emergency at a local restaurant. While enjoying dinner, Candice witnessed Ruth collapse from an apparent chocking episode. She immediately cared for her with both abdominal thrusts & CPR until EMS arrived. Candice made a difference in positive outcome through her training in live saving techniques.

Fab Four (Mosquito Lake) – Scot Oehlstrom, Rod Schaaf, Mike Soots & Zachery Westrich all had one thing in common on this cold January afternoon – ice fishing. Their second commonality became sharply apparent when they collaborated together to help a family of seven when their tent broke through the ice and heard their calls for help. Nearly 30 yards from shore with a ten-year-old untested rope and the determination of these four enthusiasts knew they had to act fast due to hypothermia. These men, with the screams for help ranging in ages from 7 to 34 were answered in affirmative actions rescuing each one from the frigid water. All survived the frightening ordeal because of the bravery of this fab four who now have more in common; they are heroes.

Mat Jamison (Girard) – Officer Jamison was on routine patrol when he noticed fire at the back of a duplex apartment in the city. After calling the fire department, he felt he had to act now to avoid a possible tragic outcome and entered the burning building with disregard for his own safety to rescue the adults & children inside. Girard Police Chief, John Norman interjected that Jamison had no reservations on going into the house, knocking on doors and getting the people to safety. The department, the city and the community are proud to recognize and honor his efforts that go above and beyond his call of duty.

Judy Sheve (Ashtabula) – Is another of our heroes that knew what to do in a choking emergency, such is the case of a fortunate 91-year-old Simone Campbell. While attending a senior center bridge club night, waitress Judy, recognized the chocking patron and with quick action of abdominal thrusts saved a golden life. In a twist, she left the tip that night; training is paramount in an emergency.

Madison Withrow (Ashtabula) – Is only 10 years old, which is why sharing her story of courage is so important. Madison was home with her mom and her 5 younger siblings when a fire broke out in their home. Against all odds and the will of passion, she was able to carry two 4-month-old twins and return for a 2-year-old brother to safety before first responders arrived. Sadly, Maddie nor the fire fighters could rescue her mother or two younger brothers. We honor and celebrate her selfless courage.

If handling emergencies like the preceding honorees are called acts of courage. Then planning to avoid a life-threatening emergency also falls into the same category, but over a longer period of time as with our next hero.

David Crawford (Canfield) – The local High School is the epicenter of a friendship of Coach Crawford and his boss, Athletic Director, Greg Cooper. Greg was diagnosed with non-alcoholic end stage liver disease-cirrhosis and was waiting for a match. When the coach found out that he was an exact match, “I knew I had the chance to save my friend” he said. That he did, donating 65% of his liver to save Greg’s life that would have ended all too soon.Greg’s daughter delivered a public heartfelt message of affection for the Crawford family and David’s gift of life for her father in a compassionate moment.

Hill Barth & King (HBK) – Was awarded the Spirit of the Red Cross. Founded in Youngstown in 1949 with seventeen offices in five states, they exemplify leadership in the community; compassion for its people and dedication to the life saving mission of the Red Cross.

The closing remarks by chapter director, Karen Conklin, expressed the compassion for family, a friend or a stranger develops extraordinary character, courage and humility that is the spirit of the Red Cross.

Thank you to the Acts of Courage Committee, chair Grinstein, the chapter board, committee judges and the awesome staff for their planning.  It was a proud night for our chapter to honor these recipients. Congratulations and thank you for your selfless acts of courage & spirit!

World Sickle Cell Awareness Day highlights need to fill Missing Types

By Glinda Dames Fincher

June 16, 2019- My name is Glinda Dames Fincher and I have lived with sickle cell disease for 60 years. Today is World Sickle Cell Awareness Day.

Sickle cell disease affects red blood cells. It makes them hard and sickle shaped instead of soft and round. As a result, blood has difficulty flowing smoothly through the blood vessels and carrying oxygen to the rest of the body.  This causes severe anemia and excruciating pain called sickle cell crisis.

Because of my illness, I depend on blood donors giving blood on a regular basis. As part of my treatment, I receive monthly red cell exchange transfusions. I receive two pints of red blood cells during each of these transfusions. If I have to undergo a major surgery, I receive a total exchange transfusion, which requires about seven to nine units of red cells. I have received regular blood transfusions for the last 20 years to help manage my sickle cell disease. Without donated blood, sickle cell patients face sickle cell crisis, and other complications such as strokes, organ failure, chronic wounds, and shortened lifespan.

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Glinda Dames Fincher speaks at the the Missing Types campaign kick-off at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland

Since most of those with sickle cell in the U.S. are of African and Latino descent, those who receive frequent blood transfusions need blood from those of their same race in order to decrease the chances of the patient having a reaction to the red cells. African American and Latino blood donors are greatly needed to provide the lifesaving transfusions needed not only by those with sickle cell, but also those with other diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and other chronic disorders.”

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I encourage everyone to help fill the Missing Types this summer. Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited blood disorder in the US and the world, with about 100,000 with the disease in the US, and an estimated 10 million with the disease worldwide and 100 million carriers of the sickle gene which they may pass on to their children. More blood donors are needed now. Join the American Red Cross and give blood to ensure patients like myself, and so many others, have the lifesaving treatment we need.

Do your part to help fill the missing types this summer and help save lives by visiting RedCrossBlood.org/MissingTypes to schedule a donation appointment today.