Chris and Jim Davis named 2019 Festival of Trees honorary co-chairs

By Eric Alves, Regional Communications Specialist, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio

November 18, 2019- The American Red Cross Lake Erie/Heartland Chapter named Chris and Jim Davis the 2019 honorary co-chairs for the annual Festival of Trees, which will be held on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 at the Shisler Conference Center in Wooster.

Jim and Chris Davis

Chris and Jim Davis

The event helps raise funds for the Red Cross to help residents who are affected by disasters like home fires and flooding in Ashland, Holmes, Richland and Wayne counties.

The Davis’ were both born and raised in Orrville, Ohio and attended Orrville High School together. Both have led a life of service, with Chris serving as a teacher and director at the Trinity Christian Pre-School for 28 years and Jim a police officer at the Orrville Police Department. Currently, they own and operate the Orrville Dairy Queen, which Jim’s mother and father purchased in 1984.

“We support the American Red Cross and their mission, which is to prevent and alleviate human suffering,” said Chris Davis. “I think of them as the number one second responder, right after police and fire, our first responders. Your contribution to help stays here for local disaster services and programs.”

The Festival of Trees, one of the area’s premiere holiday events since 1990, has generated funds for local Red Cross disaster relief for families experiencing home fires, floods or tornadoes.

FOT

The fundraising event features beautifully decorated holiday trees, wreaths, centerpieces and baskets donated by local artisans and decorators. The holiday decorations will be auctioned at the event.

Additionally, local companies have donated wonderful and unique items for the auction, such as a ride for two on the Goodyear blimp and a trip to Disney World.

For more information and to purchase tickets to the event, visit redcross.org/trees19.

Akron Brass remains a local champion through Red Cross partnership

By Mike Arthur, Disaster Program Manager, Lake Erie/Heartland Chapter (South)

November 15, 2019- When I have trouble with my work equipment, I call the Red Cross information technology (IT) department and they help me fix the problem. At worst, it means I’m not very productive for a short period of time. In my previous career as a firefighter, if I had trouble with my equipment it could have resulted in injury or death.

akron-brass-logo-horizontal-color

For the last 100 years, the Akron Brass Company has made quality equipment to ensure that firefighters are able to put fires out and save lives. Every firefighter knows about Akron Brass, and how good their products are. I recently had the opportunity to visit their offices and got to meet many of their staff members. Akron Brass is an incredible partner of the American Red Cross. This year alone they have provided funds to support our Home Fire Campaign and are the presenting sponsor of the Lake Erie/Heartland Chapter Festival of Trees event in Wooster next month. In addition, the company actively participates in hosting blood drives, including the Wooster Battle of the Badges event, which pits the police against the fire department in a friendly competition.

FOT

I was at Akron Brass headquarters on Friday, November 8th, when employees assembled 150 comfort kits for veterans.

The Akron Brass Company is a world leader in fire products, as well as a local champion for Wayne County and the state of Ohio.

To view more photos from the Akron Brass care kit assembly event, visit our Flickr page.

Stay safe this winter with these tips to keep warm

By Eric Alves, Regional Communications Specialist, American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio

November 14, 2019- Did you know that heating fires are the second leading cause of home fires, and fixed and portable space heaters, including wood stoves, are involved in 74 percent of fire-related deaths?

As the cold weather continues to creep into Northeast Ohio, residents continue to take efforts to keep their homes warm from the freezing temperatures. Unfortunately, some of those efforts can lead to tragic consequences.

heating-en

Over the past two winter-like days, the American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio responded to 8 home fires, several related to alternative home heating sources, resulting in 23 residents being assisted and $3,695 in immediate financial assistance.

Nearly half of American families use alternative heating sources such as space heaters, fireplaces or wood/coal stoves to stay warm. According to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, every year, more than 200 people die from carbon monoxide produced by fuel burning appliances in the home.

Kentucky Ice Storm

If you and your family use alternative heating sources to stay warm, here are some prevention tips to help keep you safe this winter:

  • Keep all potential sources of fuel like paper, clothing, bedding or rugs at least three feet away from space heaters, stoves or fireplaces.
  • Portable heaters and fireplaces should never be left unattended.
  • Turn off space heaters and make sure any embers in the fireplace are extinguished before going to bed or leaving home.
  • Place space heaters on a level, hard, nonflammable surface, like a ceramic tile floor, and away from bedding and drapes.
  • Keep children and pets away from space heaters.
  • When buying a space heater, look for models that shut off automatically if the heater falls over.
  • NEVER use a cooking range or oven to heat your home.
  • Use a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs.
  • Have wood and coal stoves, fireplaces, chimneys and furnaces professionally inspected and cleaned once a year.

Kentucky Ice Storm

How to keep family and friends safe from carbon monoxide?

  • Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headaches, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness and confusion. If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning, move quickly to a fresh air location and then call 9-1-1.
  • Install carbon monoxide alarms in central locations on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas. Test the alarm every month.
  • Treat the alarm signal as a real emergency each time. If alarm sounds and you are not experiencing any symptoms, press the reset button. If the alarm continues to sound, call the fire department.

Visit redcross.org/homefires for more information on how to prevent heating fires.

Volunteering: The gift of your time

By Sue Wilson Cordle, American Red Cross volunteer

November 13, 2019- The holidays are almost upon us and as you look ahead to the busy time from just before Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day, many of us feel a mix of expectation and trepidation. The expectation is for a joyful season with family and friends—but the reality for many who are struggling financially or emotionally, is that this time of year can be stressful. There are experts galore with suggestions for getting through the season, But one consistent theme: Giving to others can improve your own mental health.

Winter DAT workers

But wait—doesn’t giving to others add to the stress?

Remember the holiday classic “A Christmas Story,” when Schwartz took the double-dog dare and got his tongue stuck on the metal pole? How about this holiday challenge that doesn’t involve losing any skin? Ask yourself this question: Can you think of any of the gifts you received last year? Now think about how many you bought for family, friends and co-workers. If you’re honest with yourself, you probably remember very few (if any) but you do remember you had to make payments on your credit card long after that last Amazon delivery.

Flick-s-tongue-stuck-to-pole-A-Christmas-Story-gif-thecountess-40069078-600-338

This year make the holiday season LESS about consumerism and MORE about people. How?

Become a volunteer. According to this recent article written by Jeanne Segal, Ph.D., and Lawrence Robinson, volunteering has surprising health benefits. It can reduce stress, combat depression, keep you mentally stimulated and provide a sense of purpose. And if you think your income level, age, or even a disability prevents you from volunteering, research shows that people with disabilities or health conditions ranging from hearing and vision loss to heart disease, diabetes or digestive disorders all show improvement after volunteering.

The American Red Cross has a number of ways you can donate your time and talent. You can take a quiz that will match your skill set, age, interests or goals to find a volunteer opportunity that is right for you. From 18 to 80 (and beyond), there is something you can do to help the Red Cross in its mission to alleviate suffering in your own backyard or around the world.

Development SAF Stock Photography Project 2018

Right now, the Red Cross has three specific needs that are high priority volunteer positions: a blood donor ambassador, a blood transportation specialist and a disaster action team member. It is volunteers in priority positions like these, or in any number of roles, who carry out 90 percent of the humanitarian work of the Red Cross.

Your favorite memories surrounding the holidays or about life in general probably don’t involve gifts at all. They involve rituals and traditions, feelings and emotions—all involving quality time spent doing something important, whether with loved ones or a community of strangers that can become friends with purpose in the world of volunteering.

Carrollton STA

This year, give something that means something. Give the gift of your time and become a volunteer. Do it alone or team up with a friend or family member. It will be a gift that is far more valuable than anything money can buy. It will be a gift you’ll remember forever.

To explore opportunities to share your gift of time, visit Redcross.org.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Serving country and community: Dave Riegler, U.S. Army veteran and Red Cross volunteer

A Veterans Day volunteer profile

By Tim Poe, American Red Cross volunteer

Editor’s note: Regional CEO Mike Parks’ Veterans Day message follows this profile of a volunteer and a veteran.

On Veterans Day, we honor, celebrate, and thank all who served in the United States armed forces, and we at the American Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region are especially proud and thankful for the many veterans who continue to serve our communities as Red Cross volunteers. Dave Riegler, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and volunteer based at the Summit, Portage, and Medina Counties Chapter, is one of these extraordinary individuals.

Dave RieglerDave began volunteering with the Red Cross in 2005. While recovering from a major surgery, he saw the coverage and call for volunteers after Hurricane Katrina and knew he could help.

And his help has been extraordinary. After serving at a call center in Washington, DC following Katrina, Dave has taken on a number of critical roles and responsibilities over the last 14 years. Dave estimates he has deployed about a dozen times to major disasters and regularly assists in our region. His responsibilities include logistics, warehousing, and database operations, and he often uses his skills to locate and procure needed resources.

Dave’s assistance is greatly appreciated. Rachel Telegdy, Executive Director for the Summit, Portage, and Medina Counties Chapter, stated, “Dave is the type of volunteer that will always step in to help in any way. No matter the day or time I know I can call Dave and never worry about the job getting done. His get it done attitude is commendable and his smile is contagious!”

Dave’s military and private sector accomplishments are also exceptional. He served in the U.S. Army for more than 28 years, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. In addition, Dave had a 40-year career at Goodyear. He began as a machinist and, after earning his engineering degree, moved to corporate engineering. He retired from both the Army and Goodyear in 1997.

Dave is also involved with a number of veterans’ and service organizations, including the Mogadore Lions Club, VFW, a retired military officers’ group, and is a 4th Degree member of the Knights of Columbus. He has a busy Veterans Day and week ahead.

During the interview, Dave’s giving nature was apparent. When asked what he most enjoys about volunteering with the Red Cross, Dave replied meeting people within the organization and helping those in need. He also mentioned that, over the years, he has given blood every time he could. Helping was the major theme in our discussion.

Dave noted how the military and the Red Cross share a commitment to training. When he deploys to a disaster, for instance, the Red Cross ensures everyone has the needed skills.

And he expressed how serving helps instill a sense of personal satisfaction, as well as providing perspective and understanding. For instance, Dave mentioned that there are things in life where we may ask why we’re even bothering. While working with the Red Cross, he sees why.

Finally, Dave said he appreciates being thanked when someone learns he is a veteran. He is sure to thank fellow veterans as well. To Dave and all veterans, on behalf of all of us in the Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region, thank you.

 

CEO’s Veterans Day message                                                                                     By Mike Parks, American Red Cross

Memorial Day Blog

Greetings to our Northeast Ohio Red Cross Family:  Today, Veterans Day, we have the privilege to honor those members of our armed forces who have faithfully served our great nation.  I use the word “privilege” intentionally because I recently had the “privilege” to attend the funeral of the last remaining World War II Coast Guard POW in Buffalo, NY when the Coast Guard and the community honored this fallen hero whose remains were finally returned home after 77 years.  LT Thomas James Eugene “Jimmy” Crotty was the youngest of five boys and a girl born to Irish immigrants in Buffalo’s old Fifth Ward in 1912.  He also was the captain of the Coast Guard Academy’s football team, president of his graduating class, and a gifted young officer who was sent to rescue passengers off the burning liner Morro Castle and later served as a special deputy on the Bering Sea Patrol.  He was a hero of Corregidor and a survivor of the Bataan Death March.  And on July 19, 1942, Crotty, was dying of diphtheria in the squalid Cabanatuan Prisoner of War Camp, soon to be given last rites at the edge of a mass grave and lost to his countrymen for 77 years.  I was humbled to be in attendance as Coast Guard paid tribute to LT Jimmy Crotty and his family for their sacrifice.  It was a sobering reminder of all those men and women who have worn the uniform of this country, serving with distinction and humility, so we can all enjoy the freedoms we so often take for granted.  The link below is a short clip of the service honoring LT Crotty.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=lt+james+crotty+pow&qpvt=lt+james+crotty+pow&view=detail&mid=BB19DF23AE7D12EB7805BB19DF23AE7D12EB7805&&FORM=VRDGAR

 A bit closer to home, our own Cleveland Cavaliers honored service members at a recent home game.  I’ve included a clip of the moving halftime ceremony featuring our Greater Cleveland Chapter board member, Nic Barlage of the Cavs, recognizing the commitment and dedication of a service members.

https://www.nba.com/cavaliers/video/teams/cavaliers/2019/11/06/2871694/1573003408385-19-20-salute-service-halftime-2871694

Within less than a week, I was privileged (there’s that word again) to observe two moving and meaningful tributes honoring members who served in our armed forces.  I remain moved and humbled by their sacrifices and by those of so many other soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen. On this Veterans Day, we all will have the opportunity and privilege, should we choose to seize upon them, to thank and honor those who have served, or are serving our nation, in uniform—please do!  To all of you reading this who have served in the armed forces—thank you for your service and for your sacrifice!  I often come across people who express their regret in having not served in the military.  I always tell them they can still serve now by supporting our military and their families in any number of ways.  November marks Military Family Appreciation Month—I would like to take a moment to thank every spouse, parent, sibling, child, and loved one who supports our men and women of the armed forces—as the above video clips confirm—families make great sacrifices as well. 

 In closing, I hope you share my sincere gratitude in serving in the world’s premier humanitarian organization that traces its roots back to supporting those on the battlefields and continues to serve our armed forces each and every day.  Stay well, stay safe, and remember to thank a veteran and their family!!  Best regards…Mike

Michael N. Parks
Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard (Retired)
Chief Executive Officer
American Red Cross Northeast Ohio Region

Red Cross internship offers unique perspective and community-building skills for local social work students

By Jason Copsey, American Red Cross volunteer

November 8, 2019 – When Jessi Graber, a senior in Cleveland State University’s School of Social Work was considering internship opportunities, she was surprised to see ‘American Red Cross Disaster Relief’ as an option.

“I thought it was interesting because I knew about the Red Cross blood blood drives, but I never considered the Red Cross for case work,” said Jessi. “I got excited when I learned how much the Red Cross helps families and supports the community.”Jessi

Jessi applied to become a Red Cross Disaster Relief intern through her program at CSU. The American Red Cross of Northeast Ohio partners with Cleveland State University to place students in internship programs, a requirement for graduates of its School of Social Work.

                    Jessi Graber

“The internship program is a great opportunity for students to experience a unique side of social work,” said Ben Bellucci, Disaster Program Manager, American Red Cross of Greater Cleveland.

Out of more than a dozen applicants each year, five CSU students become interns in the Red Cross Disaster Services office. Interns work at the Red Cross between 13 and 18 hours per week supporting the recovery side of the Red Cross Disaster Program. They assist individuals and families displaced by man-made or natural disasters. A number of CSU students have also taken on support of the complete cycle of disaster services, including preparedness, response and recovery.

“We start each internship by building a plan for continual development,” said Ben. “Each week students provide their own assessment of themselves, how they did for the week and how they feel they are progressing in the internship. I add input as a supervisor on their progress toward achieving goals.”

Red Cross interns work for two semesters, beginning in August and ending in May. The program is structured to establish a baseline through the first semester and develop leadership and management skills during the second. Case work often adds context to class work for Red Cross interns.

“The social work competencies can be very academic in a classroom setting,” said Jessi. “But they come to life in the internship. I get to refer back to the things I’m learning, and it is a completely different perspective.”

Jessi2

One of the strongest benefits of the Red Cross Disaster Relief internship is the unique pace. At the state and county levels, it is not uncommon for case workers to follow clients for a year or more. At the Red Cross, clients cycle through in 35 days, on average.

“Because it is such a fast environment, building a relationship quickly is important,” explained Ben. “Our interns become extremely detail-oriented and learn to make connections quickly. By the time they graduate, they are able to identify gaps and recovery roadblocks immediately and know how to work around them.”

For Jessi, the best part about the experience so far has been building relationships with clients and seeing a different side of the community. She spends time each day checking in with clients via phone, email or in person, ensuring their needs are being met and that progress is made.

“No two days are alike, because no two clients are alike,” said Jessi. “Being able to help families who have experienced significant trauma is why I became interested in case work in the first place.”

For more information on internships with the Red Cross, visit our website.

Edited by Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Be prepared for the snow and cold

By Renee Palagyi, Senior Disaster Program ManagerPalagyi, Renee

Editor’s note: Renee sends a message to the Northeast Ohio regional staff every day, to accompany the daily report on disaster responses.  Here, we are sharing today’s message.

 

Not really a surprise but it appears we may be moving in to the winter season. Watch out for the “s” word in the forecast in the next few days and follow our tips to stay safe.

Beforehand:

  • Talk with your family about what to do if a winter storm watch or warning is issued. Discussing winter storms ahead of time helps reduce fear, particularly for young children.
  • Have your vehicle winterized before the winter storm season to decrease your chance of being stranded in cold weather.
  • Have a mechanic check your battery, antifreeze, wipers and windshield washer fluid, ignition system, thermostat, lights, flashing hazard lights, exhaust system, heater, brakes, defroster, and oil.
  • Install good winter tires with adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate but some jurisdictions require vehicles to be equipped with chains or snow tires with studs.
  • Keep in your vehicle: – A windshield scraper and small broom – A small sack of sand for generating traction under wheels and a set of tire chains or traction mats – Matches in a waterproof container – A brightly colored (preferably red) cloth to tie to the antenna – An emergency supply kit, including warm clothing.
  • Keep your vehicle’s gas tank full so you can leave right away in an emergency and to keep the fuel line from freezing.
  • Keep a supply of non-clumping kitty litter to make walkways and steps less slippery.
  • Service snow removal equipment before the winter storm season and maintain it in good working order.
  • Keep handy a warm coat, gloves or mittens, hat, water-resistant boots, and extra blankets and warm clothing for each member of the household.

Plow

There’s lots more to be found at:    https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/winter-storm.html