Retired Firefighter Leads Red Cross Pro Football Hall of Fame Effort

By Glenda Bogar, American Red Cross volunteer

Every year, Canton, Ohio, rolls out the red carpet—and the gold jackets—as it hosts events celebrating gridiron greats and long-time legends being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. And each year, the American Red Cross is part of the action as it provides first aid services throughout the two-week festivities.

Retired Canton City Fire Department Firefighter and Red Cross Volunteer Chuck Goldy acts as head coach for the Red Cross’ Pro Football Hall of Fame coverage. He has coordinated the effort and called the plays for six years.

“When I retired, I decided that I’ve been blessed all my career, and I wanted to continue to give back,” explained Chuck. “Now that I’m not working, I can plan and do more.”

IMG_4741

Chuck Goldy and Kim Kroh

“Red Cross relies on our volunteers each and every day in fulfilling our mission, and the Hall of Fame events are no exception,” said Kimberly Kroh, executive director of the Stark and Muskingum Lakes Chapter. “Chuck is a dedicated Red Cross volunteer and leads the Hall of Fame events every year, spending dozens of hours before, during and after these events. His dedication is inspiring to me and is also why working side by side with volunteers is the best part of my job.”  See the video with Kim and Chuck, recorded after the 2016 Hall of Fame events here.

This year, the Red Cross staffed five Pro Football Hall of Fame events. It provided first aid stations as well as hydration and cooling stations.

First aid stations are staffed by those certified in CPR/AED who are trained to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies. At hydration and cooling stations, Red Cross volunteers distribute water and provide cold towels to bring down body temperatures. Volunteers check vital signs and provide cots so individuals can recover if in distress. Equipped with two-way radios tuned in to the Canton City Fire Department channel, volunteers are ready to connect individuals to paramedics on site, if needed.

The 2018 festivities kicked off July 22 with a community parade. It was staffed by 14 Red Cross volunteers who handed out approximately 800 cups of water to parade participants.

On Friday, Aug. 3, a fashion show and luncheon at the Canton Civic Center was staffed by 12 volunteers. That evening, 16 volunteers were on hand for the Enshrinee’s Gold Jacket Dinner, attended by 4,000 guests.  Red Cross workers treated one guest for vertigo issues.

The grand parade was Saturday, Aug. 4, and was staffed by 20 Red Cross volunteers. They distributed about 2,000 cups of water to parade marchers. With temperatures nearing 90 degrees, five individuals were treated for heat-related issues. They were high school band performers who had overheated under their heavy uniforms. After being assessed and cooled down, they were released to their parents and band directors.

Red Cross coverage culminated at the Enshrinee’s Roundtable Luncheon on Sunday, Aug. 5. Twelve volunteers staffed the event.

The Enshrinee’s Roundtable is Chuck’s favorite event.

“I enjoy the Roundtable,” he said. “The guys sit down with a sportscaster from the NFL Network. It gives an opportunity to hear their personal stories. It’s interesting to hear about their background. Some players have big hearts and they share what is meaningful to them and how they were raised. You get a better picture of who they are.”

“I’m not a huge football fan—but this is for Canton,” Chuck explained.

If you’d like to be like Chuck – and more than 1,500 other volunteers in Northeast Ohio, visit redcross.org/neo, and click “Volunteer” at the top of the page to begin the application process.

 

 

 

Effort to Eradicate Measles Worldwide Continues

By Brad Galvan, American Red Cross volunteer

Although August is National Immunization Awareness Month, the American Red Cross’s work crosses international borders with its Measles & Rubella Initiative, the Red Cross partners with global organizations on this vaccination campaign aimed at reducing measles worldwide.

measles2

Measles, one of the most contagious and severe childhood diseases is very dangerous to those who are not immunized. The disease can be debilitating and even deadly. The only true method to prevent the disease is to protect children with the measles and rubella vaccine.

Jessica Tischler, Director of International Services for the Northeast Ohio Region of the Red Cross, said the goal of the Measles & Rubella Initiative is simple: Get children vaccinated to prevent the onset of measles. “It’s worked,” Jessica said. “With the help of partners like the United Nations Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control, UNICEF and the World Health Organization, more than two billion children have benefited by the vaccine.”  She noted that there has been a nearly 80 percent reduction in cases resulting in more than 20 million deaths potentially prevented from the disease.measles3

Locally, students at Gilmour Academy in Gates Mills have been collecting money to fund the measles vaccine, which costs $2 per shot. Since the start of their fundraising effort in 2004, the Gilmour students have raised more than $30,000.  We posted this article about the efforts of the students last year.

All Northeast Ohioans can help protect children in remote villages across the world without leaving their state. Simply text PREVENT to 90999 to give $10 to the Red Cross, donate online, or call 1-800-RED CROSS.  Your gift will help children receive the lifesaving vaccine against measles

 

 

International Youth Day

By Ifat Gazia, American Red Cross volunteerifat

Over the years, since 1999, a lot has been said about the importance of International Youth Day. Every year, with a different premise, social issues and challenges are brought into the forefront, so that the roles of young men and young women are celebrated as equal partners in change and making the world a better place. But alongside the celebrations is an important reminder to raise awareness about the difficulties and challenges faced by the youth in current times.

This year’s theme is very critical and central to the contemporary debates of world peace and safety. This year International Youth Day is centered on creating safe spaces for youth worldwide.  Some of those spaces can be social, civic or even digital. But can safe spaces be really created everywhere in the world where a large portion of the population is facing war, exile and migration?

The International Committee of the Red Cross is a driving force behind international humanitarian law, a set of rules that seek to limit the effects of armed conflict by offering protection to civilians. It also sets parameters to activities that are accepted or not accepted on the battleground and beyond.

Furthermore, the organization, of which the American Red Cross is a global partner, supports the study of international humanitarian law at the secondary and university levels across the globe by providing training, internships and online resources to people who work on the ground, such as journalists, aid workers, doctors, policy makers, humanitarian practitioners or researchers.

Bringing youth together, harnessing their talent and making them speak about their fears and experiences when no one is judging them can be difficult from a practical point of view. Spaces where they can talk openly without the fear of persecution, prison and punishment are hard to create and difficult to sustain. But  as long as there are organizations like the American Red Cross and the International Committee of the Red Cross, these initiatives look very much achievable.

Back-to-School Sports Safety Tips

By Sue Wilson, American Red Cross Board Member and Volunteer Partner

August is called the “dog days of summer” for a reason. It’s the hottest month of the year for most parts of the country and this year, especially, much of the nation is suffering wave after wave of brutal heat.Icon Disaster

So when I see high school football players on practice fields, I immediately flash back to the dreaded “two-a-days.” Back in my day (yes, I’m a baby-boomer) our very football-oriented high school coaches worked the players hard in the heat twice a day during the hottest months of the summer. I’d hear about— and even witness—guys in my class pass out, get sick and suffer from what was probably heat stroke or exhaustion, as they worked out in their pads day after day in the heat. I think it was a badge of honor somehow if you made it through. However, I thought it looked barbaric. Back then, we didn’t talk about things like the importance of hydration, or the concern over head injuries and long-term damage from concussions and warming up and cooling down as we practice.

Thankfully, we know a lot more now about sports safety. But whether you are male or female, or play one of the many fall and winter sports indoors or out, back-to-school time is a good time to think about sports safety.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers some great tips to keep kids safe on the field, the court or wherever they participate in sports and recreation activities. Here are some of these tips and a few others:

Use the right equipment: Make sure kids use the right gear for the right sport and use it for both practice and the game. It is important they use protective gear like helmets, wrist guards, knee or elbow pads.

Make sure the gear fits and is in good shape: Check the equipment to assure it is in

action adult american football angry

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

good condition, fits appropriately and is worn correctly all the time—for example, avoid missing or broken buckles or compressed or worn padding.

Warm up, cool down: Before starting (or ending) any form of activity, it is important to warm up the muscles by stretching, walking and easing into the practice. At the end, the reverse is also important, so slow down and cool down. Diving right into a strenuous activity without a warm-up can cause pulled muscles, strains and potential injuries. 

Get an action plan in place: Be sure your child’s sports program or school has an action plan that includes information on how to teach athletes ways to lower their chances of getting a concussion and other injuries. Get more concussion safety tips.

Be mindful of temperature: On extremely hot or humid days, allow time for the athlete to gradually adjust to the environments to prevent heat-related injuries or illness. Parents and coaches should pay attention to each player’s activity level, give breaks and make sure they are well hydrated and appropriately dressed. The same is true in extremely cold climates. Parents and coaches need to watch for signs of heat stroke or exhaustion and frostbite and hypothermia .

Be a good role model: No one wants to be that crazy sports parent (we all know the type) screaming at the coaches and the kids from the stands. Most coaches in youth sports are volunteers and should be supported and appreciated not verbally abused. You can help promote sportsmanship from the sidelines and the stands by being respectful not only to the coaches, but to your child, their teammates, coaches, opposing teams and the officials. As a good sports parent, you can help promote sportsmanship from the sidelines and in the stands.

Icon App

Icon used on American Red Cross Apps

Prepare for an emergency: As a parent, coach or fan, it is always helpful to know basic first aid and CPR. The American Red Cross offers First Aid/CPR/AED classes and has an excellent First Aid App for your phone. Having this knowledge could be a lifesaver in just about any situation including and beyond sports. Find out more about classes and download one of the many free mobile apps here.

Partners at Lincoln Electric, Euclid Fire Department Help Make Homes Safer

Hundreds of smoke alarms installed during the company’s fourth annual effort

Madison Miller was wearing big rubber gloves – pink, her favorite color – as she helped her mommy clean the house, when she heard a knock on the door.  Outside, four workers from Lincoln Electric asked if they could come in and help make her Euclid home safer.  They were volunteering with the American Red Cross on Saturday, August 4th, as part of a Sound the Alarm home fire safety and smoke alarm installation event.

Madison’s mother, LaceJavone Hill was happy to receive the volunteers, who installed a free smoke alarm on each floor of her home.  The volunteers also told Madison and her mom how to create an escape plan.

IMG_6355

Madison Miller, 6 and her mom LaceJavone Hill

“What you’re really doing is providing an opportunity to save someone’s life,” said Chris Mapes, Chairman, President and CEO of Lincoln Electric, as he rallied the troops before they fanned out across the community.  “You probably didn’t think you’d be spending your Saturday afternoon saving lives.  But that’s what this is all about.”

IMG_6326

Chris Mapes speaks with Lincoln Electric volunteers

It was the fourth year in a row that Lincoln Electric employees and interns volunteered to install smoke alarms and provide fire safety information to residents in the community the company calls home.  This year, nearly 70 interns and employees volunteered for the Sound the Alarm event.

“The first year there were 30.  The next, 40.  Last year there were 50 Lincoln Electric volunteers.  Today, 68 of you are here,” said Mike Parks, Regional CEO of the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio. “Over the last four years, we’ll have installed well over 1,250 alarms in the city of Euclid, making close to 450 homes safer.  You are not only saving lives, you are making this community become more resilient.”

Before the smoke alarm installations took place, the volunteers gathered in the cafeteria at Villa Angela-St. Joseph High School on Lakeshore Boulevard, where they were fed pizza, hot dogs, hamburgers and chicken, barbecued in the parking lot by Euclid Fire Chief Chris Haddock, who expressed his appreciation for the work that was about to take place.

“As the fire department, on a daily basis throughout the year we install smoke alarms,” said the chief.  “But you guys will do more today than we will do all year long.  So you’re really making a difference.”

IMG_6350

Volunteer Justin Grabinski tests the alarm he installed in a Euclid home

By the end of the event, 373 smoke alarms had been installed, making 141 homes safer —including young Madison’s home.  And while the alarms should be tested every month, they are designed to last 10 years without a battery change.

Residents throughout Northeast Ohio can request smoke alarms by visiting soundthealarm.org/neo.  And those interested in helping make homes safer, like the Lincoln Electric employees did last Saturday, can apply to become a Red Cross volunteer by visiting redcross.org/neo, and clicking the volunteer tab.

See our photo album of the Lincoln Electric Sound the Alarm event on Flicker.  The pre-event “pep rally,” featuring the comments of Chris Mapes, Mike Parks, Chief Haddock, Euclid Mayor Kirsten Gail, and Red Cross Regional Disaster Program Officer Tim O’Toole were streamed live on our Facebook page, where it may still be viewed .

 

More NEO Lives Saved After Smoke Alarms Sound

By Eilene Guy, American Red Cross volunteer

2018 Richland Co Day of CaringIII

Volunteers from Mechanics Bank and the Mansfield Police Department with Red Cross workers on Richland County United Way Day of Caring,  August 3, 2018.

MANSFIELD, Ohio – Two Mansfield residents owe their very lives to free smoke alarms from the American Red Cross.

The alarms – installed during the United Way of Richland County Day of Caring on Aug. 4, 2017 – did their job on Feb. 13 this year, when fire broke out in a mobile home and a mother and her daughter were able to escape safely.

“Having working smoke alarms is vital to the safety and security of the residents in a home,” said Lara Kiefer, executive director of the Lake Erie/Heartland Chapter of the Red Cross, which serves Richland and six other northcentral Ohio counties.

“Most people think they have up to 10 minutes to safely escape a home fire, but studies show it’s closer to two minutes,” she said. The vast majority of the disasters the Red Cross responds to are home fires and tragically, seven people die every day in this country from home fire-related injuries.

In 2014, the Red Cross launched the Home Fire Campaign, a nationwide initiative to reduce the number of fire related deaths by 25 percent. Since the start of the program, more than 460 lives have been saved, including 12 in the city of Lorain.

To learn more about the importance of having working smoke alarms on every level of your home, or to ask for a home fire safety inspection and smoke alarm installation, visit soundthealarm.org/neo.

2018 Richland Co Day of CaringI

Lake Erie/Heartland Chapter Executive Director Lara Kiefer and Executive Coordinator Christina Ennis with members of the Madison Township Fire Department

On Friday, August 3rd, Red Cross volunteers and other community partners, including Mechanics Bank, the Mansfield Police Department and the Madison Township Fire Department, joined volunteers from the United Way of Richland County in this year’s Day of Caring, installing smoke alarms and providing fire safety education to Mansfield residents.

“It’s gratifying to know that our partnership with the United Way of Richland County has had such a positive impact in our community,” Keifer said, referring to the lives saved in Mansfield earlier this year.

To learn more about the many volunteer opportunities within the Red Cross – from preventing and responding to disasters (such as home fires) to serving our armed forces to teaching first aid, babysitting or water safety skills – visit redcross.org/neo and click the volunteer tab.

Veronica Wise, Volunteer and Longtime Blood Donor

By Christy Peters, External Communications Manager

Veronica Wise began her journey with the American Red Cross at the former Portage County Chapter. As a volunteer, she helped coordinate blood drives and was a regular blood donor. So regular, in fact, that she has given more than 210 pints of blood to help patients in need. It is an amazing gift to give, and Veronica was recently recognized by Nancy Janis, the Executive Director of the Summit, Portage and Medina Counties Chapter for her efforts on behalf of the Red Cross.

 

IMG_6192

Red Cross volunteer and blood donor Veronica Wise received a Red Cross pin from Nancy Janis, Executive Director of the Summit, Portage and Medina Counties Chapter.

 

Not only did Veronica impact her community and the countless patients she helped save through blood donation, she instilled that same commitment to giving in her family. Karen Wise, Veronica’s daughter, knew from a young age the importance of giving back. She watched her mother donate blood and it made an impression on her. “When I was 16 it was a given – get your driver’s license and your Red Cross donor card,” Karen said.

 

IMG_6178

Karen displays the Red Cross Blood App

When asked about donating blood, 90-year-old Veronica insists, it wasn’t hard. “I enjoyed every minute of it.” The importance of donating grew for the Wise family when another of Veronica’s daughters was diagnosed with breast cancer. The family began giving platelets in her honor. Though, sadly, she lost her battle, the family continues to give blood regularly.

 

Karen shares that Veronica’s commitment left a mark on her family. “It’s something we can continue on,” she said. The Red Cross congratulates Veronica for her many donations and thanks her for inspiring so many to join her in helping save lives.  If you are so inspired, you can make an appointment to donate blood at RedCrossBlood.org, or call 1-800 RED CROSS.

 

Photo Credit: Jim McIntyre/American Red Cross.  Visit our album on Flickr for more photos.