Red Cross and the 910th Airlift Wing team up for “Feel the Heat” event

IMG_4036IMG_4080 IMG_4095 IMG_4133 On Monday, October 27 the
American Red Cross of the Mahoning Valley and the 910th Airlift Wing teamed up to conduct a mock aircraft crash disaster training event at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station.

The 2014 “Feel the Heat” event simulated a mock aircraft crash. The 910th Civil Engineer Fire Department responded to contain the aircraft fire while the American Red Cross provided care and comfort to simulated survivors. The exercise is designed to demonstrate the high level of readiness of the air station’s first responders and the everyday work of the area’s American Red Cross staff and volunteers who respond to the plight of those in need of their services in our community. An audience of invited guests and area media outlets were on hand to observe the exercise.

Designed to showcase the partnership between the Red Cross and the military, this exercise was the second event to take place as part of the Air Force Community Partnership Initiative at Youngstown Air Reserve Station.

“This exercise is another example of community partnership and support. Since Clara Barton, the Red Cross has been committed to helping our military. We are proud to continue that tradition with our 910th Air Reserve Station and, in doing so, making our community a safer place.”

For more information about the Air Force Community Partnership Initiative, the Youngstown Air Reservation Station and more photos of the event, please visit their site.

With Halloween coming, stay safe as you don your costumes and go out to Trick-or-Treat

The Red Cross is offering the following tips to help make this Halloween safe.

Halloween’s greatest hazards aren’t vampires and villains, but falls, costume mishaps and traffic accidents.

Halloween’s greatest hazards aren’t vampires and villains, but falls, costume mishaps and traffic accidents.

TRICK OR TREAT

  • Look for flame-resistant costumes.
  • Plan the Trick-or-Treat route and make sure adults know where children are going. A parent or responsible adult should accompany young children as they make their way around the neighborhood.
  • Make sure the Trick-or-Treaters have a flashlight. Add reflective tape to costumes and Trick-or-Treat bags. Have everyone wear light-colored clothing in order to be seen.
  • Visit only the homes that have a porch light on. Accept treats at the door – never go inside.
  • Consider using face paint instead of masks, which can cover the eyes and make it hard to see.
  • Walk only on the sidewalks, not in the street. If no sidewalk is available, walk at the edge of the roadway, facing traffic. Look both ways before crossing the street and cross only at the corner. Don’t cut across yards or use alleys. Don’t cross between parked cars.
  • Be cautious around pets and any other animals.

 WELCOMING GHOSTS AND GOBLINS

If someone is welcoming Trick-or-Treaters at their home, they should make sure the outdoor light is on. Other safety steps include:

  • Sweep leaves from the sidewalks and steps.
  • Clear the porch or front yard of any obstacles that a child could trip over.
  • Restrain any household pets.
  • Use a glow stick instead of a candle in the jack-o-lantern to avoid a fire hazard.

 People can also download the Red Cross First Aid App at redcross.org/apps to get access to life-saving information on what to do for common, everyday first aid emergencies.

Are you prepared for a home fire? Test yourself

Did you realize that, on average, the Red Cross of Northeast Ohio responds to 2.5 home fires every night? While one piece of our mission is to help families displaced by these and other disasters, many households can help themselves by becoming more aware of how to reduce their chances of experiencing a fire.

2014 Katie with Fire VICTIM

In fact, the Red Cross and its local and national partners have launched the Home Fire Preparedness Campaign, an initiative that aims to reduce deaths and injuries caused by home fires by 25% in five years.

Test yourself with this handy quiz to determine what you have covered, and what you and your family may need to work on.

The Red Cross is asking every household in America to join us in taking two simple steps that can save lives: checking or installing smoke alarms and practicing fire drills at home.

Join the Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency in the second annual PrepareAthon on September 30

Join us for the second annual America’s PrepareAthon! national day of action.

The last few years have been an important reminder to all of us that disasters can strike anytime and anyplace. Nearly every region of the country experienced some form of extreme weather event, including devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma, scorching wildfires throughout California, and destructive flooding in Northeastern Ohio.

The destructive power of weather affects all communities. Learning how prepare for an emergency will help determine your course of action during a disaster.

The destructive power of weather affects all communities. Learning how prepare for an emergency will help determine your course of action during a disaster.

As with many life events, preparation is the key to success. When you prepare and practice for an emergency in advance of an event, it makes a real difference in your ability to take immediate and informed action when it matters most. Early action can also help you to recover more quickly.

That’s why thousands of individuals, organizations, schools, houses of worship, and local governments across the Nation are actively participating in a new national campaign for action – America’s PrepareAthon!

The Red Cross continues to support and promote this action-based initiative to build a more resilient Nation starting with the national day of action on September 30.

Can’t participate on September 30? Preparing for disasters is a year-round activity. So pick a date that works for you. You can still register to be counted in the movement. And be sure to post your preparedness activities on the national calendar.

It’s not a matter of if the next disaster will happen, but when. Take action and prepare now by completing simple steps such as making a plan and having an emergency kit. Start the conversation in your family today. It can help determine what you need to do next to become more prepared.

Be smart, take part, and prepare for emergencies before they strike!

Give 10 hours, help your community

Look for our volunteers on Dawg Pound Drive just outside the stadium at tomorrow’s Browns vs. Ravens game!

The Cleveland Browns are encouraging fans to volunteer 10 hours of service in their own communities during the year.

The First and Ten initiative, which launched in June of 2014, is the first of its kind in the NFL. The Browns are hoping that fans will volunteer over 500,000 hours to communities throughout the area, and really, anywhere that a Browns Fan may live. With over 10,000 pledges already in, they are well on their way to meeting that goal.

This is a perfect partnership for the American Red Cross, which relies on volunteers to continue its mission to prevent and eliminate human suffering in the face of emergencies. Volunteers make up more than 94% of the workforce of the Red Cross.

How can you volunteer to #Give10 hours to the Red Cross in your community?

You can get started as a volunteer by going to www.redcross.org/volunteer and filling out the online form.

Then head over the Brown’s First and Ten website to register, as a Browns’ fan, to give 10 hours in your community.

Share your #Give10 story

If you are social media savvy, you can share your story of giving 10 hours by using the hashtag #Give10 on Twitter. Then tag @BrownsGiveBack and @NEORedCross. Fans can follow the #Give10 movement on Twitter by following @BrownsGiveBack or searching for the hashtag #Give10.

 

Not on twitter? Share your story of volunteerism by visiting the First and Ten site.